Active Reading

Active Reading

Learning Outcome #3:

Active Reading When reading for content, I will often stop and think about a sentence or paragraph and will reread it several times. I will often take notes on the readings, but it is rare that I do that within the text. Whenever I have tried to annotate within the text, I am not able to fully develop the ideas or comments and when I come back later, I am less able to appreciate what my point was. (https://www.drogueriasanjorge.com/) What has really helped me in this class has been to think about reading for various purposes such as challenging or extending or even reading for rhetorical analysis. This has helped me think about the article content in quite different ways and in some cases sparked the ideas that were included in subsequent essays. For example, I made an extending annotation regarding Turkle’s comment that children…rather than daydream, where they can take time alone with their thoughts.” I had recently read an article on problem solving and daydreaming and so her comments made me think about how children just don’t do this anymore and that perhaps they can’t because their brains don’t know how to. I made the note that daydreaming or just thinking is critical to our neurodevelopment after reading this sentence in her essay. For me, extending comments go along with exploring relationships. Both of these types of close reading were newer to me. In the past, I might read something that reminds me of something else I had read or seen but I never explored the connection. In this class, I made an effort to do this. For example, in my annotations for Appiah’s essay I connected the relationship between his comment that “conversation doesn’t have to lead to consensus about anything…it’s enough that it helps people get used to one another” to the blog audio we listened to about changing minds. To me the concept of how one changes people’s minds was relevant to almost every article or essay we read throughout the semester.

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